LYNCH MOB Shares Lyric Video For New Single ‘Caught Up’

Frontiers Music Srl will release of the new studio album from LYNCH MOB, “Babylon”, on October 20.

Joining revered guitarist and band founder George Lynch (THE END MACHINE, THE BANISHMENT, ex-DOKKEN) for this latest LYNCH MOB LP are vocalist Gabriel Colón, bassist Jaron Gulino (TANTRIC, HEAVENS EDGE),and drummer Jimmy D’Anda (ex-BULLETBOYS).

Watch a lyric video for second single “Caught Up” below.

Lynch says: “There’s been so many iterations of LYNCH MOB since the first lineup in 1989 of Oni Logan, Mick Brown, Anthony Esposito and myself. Putting LYNCH MOB together was just an extension of what I’d always strived for in a band: the best possible musicians, chemistry, and brotherhood. My bands have not only been my best friends, but also family. When we come up together and work hard and struggle together, we create a bond that lasts a lifetime. I think that’s the thing I love the most about my musical journey…creating music in the studio, stepping on stage, and sharing that bond with my friends through music. Thank you to everyone who has been in my band. I really feel it’s ours.”

New Jersey’s own Jaron Gulino brings the east coast attitude and energy to LYNCH MOB. He has prospered in a long career as the bassist in a variety of bands, most notably post-grunge rock band TANTRIC. Gulino achieved chart topping success with multiple releases from TANTRIC, as well as performing on many high-profile tours and events with numerous other acts. He is also currently the bassist for Philadelphia hard rockers HEAVENS EDGE.

His bandmate and partner in crime in the rhythm section is none other than original BULLETBOYS drummer Jimmy D’Anda, who is known for his ability to bring a fantastic element of groove while maintaining the powerful hard rock vibe of LYNCH MOB.

Gabriel Colón is a Puerto Rican singer who started his career with a band called FAST TAKER. Since then, he has showcased his wide range of vocal talent with many rock acts including GOTHIC KNIGHTS, CULPRIT, WHITE WIZZARD and Rowan Robertson. Gabriel is a true talent and a great fit to fill the shoes of his extremely talented predecessors in LYNCH MOB.

LYNCH MOB was formed in 1989 after George Lynch parted ways with his former band DOKKEN. Their debut release “Wicked Sensation” was met with critical and fan acclaim and went on to be certified gold in sales by the RIAA. The band would continue on through the years with a cast of talented players joining Lynch throughout their musical journey over the course of six more studio albums. “Babylon” is LYNCH MOB‘s eighth studio album overall and the first since 2017’s “The Brotherhood”.

Don’t miss LYNCH MOB on tour this fall including a Talk Shop Live virtual appearance on October 18 and a special record-release party show at the Whisky A Go Go in West Hollywood on October 25.

“Babylon” track listing:

01. Erase
02. Time After Time
03. Caught Up
04. I’m Ready
05. How You Fall
06. Million Miles Away
07. Let It Go
08. Fire Master
09. The Synner
10. Babylon

LYNCH MOB is:

Gabriel Colón: Vocals
George Lynch: Guitars
Jimmy D’Anda: Drums
Jaron Gulino: Bass

For much of 2021 and 2022, George had played dates around the U.S. under the name ELECTRIC FREEDOM, which he previously said was the new name of his “touring entity” after deciding to retire the LYNCH MOB band name in 2020. However, ten months ago, it was reported that Lynch was once again playing shows under the LYNCH MOB moniker.

Lynch discussed his change of heart in an interview with Full In Bloom. He said: “[LYNCH MOB is] just a brand I’d established for decades, obviously — over three decades. Nothing’s perfect, and I’ve gotta just live with the fact that it has some negative connotations that I probably have to continue explaining for the rest of my life, and I don’t mind doing that. But it is a brand that I built, and I’m just gonna stick with it. As far as a marketing thing and a brand thing and a business thing and a working thing, and it keeps my band guys working and it keeps the fans happy, it makes sense.

“I really felt, when I adopted ELECTRIC FREEDOM, that I was really going against the grain more than keeping the old name,” he laughed. “I really felt a lot more resistance than I’d ever felt having LYNCH MOB; that was actually the reality of it. Nobody really liked it. And I didn’t like living with that; it was just kind of uncomfortable. It’s, like, ‘Okay, well, we’ve just gotta put up with George‘s decision here to do this, but nobody agrees with it. We’re not comfortable with it.’ It has a sort of disingenuous ring to it. As much as my motives were pure — I felt honest — it just never caught on, on all kinds of levels.”

Asked if he had gotten any negative comments from fans over the LYNCH MOB name, George said: “I may have had a few in the 35 years it’s been around, but I’d say probably the most negative criticism I’ve had of it came from me. So I was my own worst critic with the name, especially in later years. I got a lot more criticism with ELECTRIC FREEDOM.

“It’s a brand,” George explained. “I mean, nobody wants Coke to change their recipe. Just stay the same, and that’s what you built over the years. Why would you…? ‘Why would you change it’ is a rhetorical question. Why I’m probably not more successful in some ways in my career is because I followed my aspirations musically rather than sometimes be smart about just sticking to the plan. [Laughs]”

The news of LYNCH MOB‘s return was first reported by the Metal Sludge web site on October 1, 2022.

In August 2020, Lynch announced that he was ending LYNCH MOB due to the racial insensitivity of the moniker, saying he would no longer record or perform under that name.

A few months later, Lynch offered a lengthy explanation for why he was ending LYNCH MOB during an interview with George Dionne of Metal Express Radio. Addressing questions about why it took him three decades to call it quits with LYNCH MOB, George said: “When we first formed the band in ’89, the name had sort of already been around. While I was in DOKKEN, it’s what I called our little group of guitar fans — I had picks made; it was kind of a little subculture within DOKKEN. When we started working on developing and building the band after DOKKEN broke up, that was just the name that we always thought we’d use, ’cause it was a perfect fit — it’s my name, and it describes it pretty well. And, of course, the negative connotations were always there, and I was aware of ’em, but not as aware as I probably should have been. [Laughs]

“I had made numerous attempts over the decades to kind of let that name go and had walked that back for multiple reasons — usually because of business considerations,” he continued. “For instance, if you try to go out on a tour and not use the name, promoters aren’t gonna be happy with you changing it. People aren’t gonna know who you are. They’re not gonna show up, because what’s THE GEORGE LYNCH EXPERIENCE, or whatever you call it. Or record labels are not interested, because it’s a brand that they can count on and sell a certain many albums or whatever.

“For instance, the LYNCH MOB record ‘Smoke This’ that came out, I think, in ’99 or 2000, that was not supposed to be a LYNCH MOB record; that really wasn’t anything to do with LYNCH MOB. At the end of the day, after the record was done and we were delivering it to the label, they insisted on using that name as insurance. And if I hadn’t agreed to that, we wouldn’t have had a record. That’s the kind of pressure I’m talking about.

“But then, with the onset of everything that’s happened in the last year, I didn’t have that kind of pressure anymore,” George added. “I could take it or leave it at this point. And I didn’t really feel comfortable with it; I didn’t feel comfortable with the name. ‘Cause I’m a very progressive person politically, and it just so flies in the face of everything I believe in, and it makes it hard. It makes it hard to have relationships with people and explain yourself, and I got tired of rationalizing it. I think the music is bigger than that, and it’s had a great run.

“Another reason, too, is the band fell apart again. The band has fallen apart so many times, I can’t even count. And it was just, like, ‘No more Oni [Logan, vocals], no more Brian Tichy [drums], no more this guy, no more that guy. Oh, great. Now what do I do?’ It’s, like, ‘Okay, build another band from scratch, call it LYNCH MOB?’ No. How about just build something new? It gives me a lot more freedom to basically play anything I want live… I can go out and play everything from my catalog — new, old, covers, jams, you name it, and go deep and have fun and change it up every night.”

Oni first hooked up with LYNCH MOB in 1990, but exited the group after the release of its first album, only to rejoin the outfit in the late 2000s.

Logan is featured on five of LYNCH MOB‘s eight albums, including 1990’s “Wicked Sensation”, as well as 2009’s “Smoke And Mirrors”, 2014’s “Sun Red Sun”, 2015’s “Rebel” and 2017’s “The Brotherhood”.

In August 2021, LYNCH MOB celebrated the 30th anniversary of “Wicked Sensation” with a special limited print/deluxe edition of the album. “Wicked Sensation Reimagined” features re-worked and re-recorded versions of the LP’s classic songs, and was made available via Rat Pak Records.


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